Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
November 29, 2014

Posts by Emily Cahn

3 Posts

April 21, 2014

Ranking Member Fundraising Battle: Pallone Gets Cash From Tech, Health Care Industries

APPLE presser001 020812 445x300 Ranking Member Fundraising Battle: Pallone Gets Cash From Tech, Health Care Industries

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. received donations from health care groups and technology giants, and gave money to more than a dozen fellow Democrats, including some in vulnerable seats, a new filing for his leadership political action committee shows.

The New Jersey Democrat, vying for the ranking member slot on the Energy and Commerce Committee in a closely-contested race, raised $116,000 for Shore PAC in the month of March. Among the groups giving money were Microsoft, AT&T, Comcast and NBC Universal.

Pallone also racked up cash from health care groups, including the American Medical Association, American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Hospital Association, American Psychiatric Association, American College of Cardiology, American College of Surgeons Professional Association and the American Academy of Neurology.

He spent $49,000, according to the PAC filing.

Members he gave to include Reps. Nick J. Rahall II of West Virginia; Raul Ruiz of California; Kyrsten Sinema, Ann Kirkpatrick and Ron Barber of Arizona; Tim Walz of Minnesota; John Barrow of Georgia; Dan Maffei of New York and Timothy H. Bishop of New York; Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire and Brad Schneider of Illinois, among others.

Pallone’s rival for the panel position to replace retiring Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Anna G. Eshoo of California, raised $203,000 over the quarter, a longer filing period, for her leadership PAC. Her donations mostly came from high-tech and telecommunication firms.

Full story

April 8, 2014

Cantor: McAllister Right to Apologize After Kissing Video

cantor012214 445x296 Cantor: McAllister Right to Apologize After Kissing Video

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia said Tuesday that embattled Rep. Vance McAllister was right to apologize to his constituents, but did not say whether the freshman Louisiana lawmaker would face repercussions within the Republican Conference.

“I think that his constituents deserve an apology. [That’s] why he gave an apology,” Cantor said. “I’ve not had a chance to speak to the congressman, so I’m going to reserve further judgment on the question. I will say the American people deserve all the representatives here in Washington to hold to a very high standard of behavior.”

A video posted online Monday allegedly shows the congressman kissing a staffer in his Louisiana district office. McAllister issued an apology after the video appeared, but a wide field of would-be successors are already jockeying for consideration for the seat, should the 40-year-old lawmaker choose to step down.

Full story

November 15, 2013

Immigration Reform Will Happen ‘Later Next Year,’ Walden Says

walden 103 031313 445x296 Immigration Reform Will Happen Later Next Year, Walden Says

Walden told reporters Friday that the House could take up an immigration overhaul next year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

An immigration overhaul in the House isn’t dead, but it won’t happen this year, the chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee said Friday.

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., said the House would likely pass legislation to fix the nation’s broken immigration system by the end of next year. He made the comments at a Friday breakfast briefing with reporters that was sponsored by The Christian Science Monitor.

“The speaker has said on more than one occasion that this is a federal problem. I’ve said this is a federal problem. It needs to be dealt with by the federal government, so I think you’ll see it come,” the first-term NRCC chairman said. “It’s a matter of timing, in part because of everything else that hasn’t been done yet with the whole government funding issue and all of that has eaten up a lot of time. So my guess it it will happen later next year.”

Conventional wisdom had been that if the House was going to address immigration, it would have to be before the end of 2013 to avoid narrowing in the 2014 elections. But some House Republicans have been worried that moving anything as controversial as immigration legislation might imperil members facing right-wing primary challenges. Full story

By Emma Dumain and Emily Cahn Posted at 11:15 a.m.
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