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February 9, 2016

Posts in "Republicans"

February 9, 2016

Republicans Won’t Even Talk About Obama’s Final Budget


The year that promised a return to regular order is getting off to a highly irregular start.

Like a mantra, GOP leaders have repeatedly declared 2016 would be different. Lawmaking for the history books isn’t much in the offing, they conceded, but at least the legislative machinery will once again work as designed – in setting the budget, most of all.  The leadership’s practical view has been the rank-and-file from both parties, and the institution of Congress itself, require that much respect now for there to be a chance real collaboration and comity would return sometime in the future.

The sincerity of this commitment has become highly suspect, however, now that top Republicans have scrapped the very first piece of the budgetary process under their control.

Full story

February 8, 2016

Cruz and Rubio Differ in Style, Not So Much on Votes


CruzAfter-02.jpg

The metaphor of the ideological “lane” has become the dominant way to describe the dynamics of the Republican presidential race.

Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary is supposed to reveal if Ted Cruz has claimed a prime position on the “insurgent” side of the road and whether Marco Rubio has pushed to the front of the “establishment” lane.

But the best empirical evidence from their senatorial records reveal that, while their styles of conservatism are undeniably different, they have nonetheless ended up taking the same positions on policy substance far more often than not. The votes they’ve cast suggest they’re close enough to touch across the white stripes symbolically dividing the GOP. Full story

February 2, 2016

What One House GOP Retirement May Say About the Future


UNITED STATES - MARCH 3:  Rep. Reid Ribble, R-Wis., speaks during the House Republicans' news conference on the repeal of the1099 requirement on Thursday, March 3, 2011. (Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)

Is Ribble’s retirement the canary in the calming for Republicans? (Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)

At first glance, the Reid Ribble retirement doesn’t appear headline-worthy. Yes, he is now among 16 House Republicans, half from tea party takeover class of 2010, to announce a voluntary departure at year’s end. But, no, that retirement roster is hardly extraordinary, and it’s little surprise that a decent number of those insurgent outsiders have concluded they’ve made their mark and can move on.

Just below the surface, though, Ribble’s decision to abandon the congressional seat for northeastern Wisconsin looks like a canary in the coal mine’s warning about the future of the GOP.
Full story

February 1, 2016

David Hawkings’ Whiteboard: Congressional Factions


Factions 2

This week on the whiteboard, Roll Call Senior Editor David Hawkings breaks down Congress’ many political factions.

Full story

January 28, 2016

Who’ll Be First in Congress to Endorse Trump?


UNITED STATES - JANUARY 27: Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., gets off the Senate subway as he arrives for the Senate Republicans' policy lunch on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sessions has been effusive in his praise for Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Of all Donald Trump’s curious unblemished records, this one will almost surely end pretty soon: At last one member of Congress will endorse him for president.

As good a bet as any is that this signal move will come from Jeff Sessions, the junior Republican senator from Alabama.

Full story

January 25, 2016

A Power Congress Grabbed, Then Rarely Used


Reid once had grand plans. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid helped insert the “atom bomb” into legislation years ago. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Twenty years ago, it was enacted as a classically obscure legislative rider, an opaquely worded few paragraphs, crafted by both parties, which each side agreed to keep quiet before its insertion into sprawling must-pass legislation focused on a wholly different issue.

Fifteen years ago, when the provision was first put to use, some lawmakers decried the unleashing of an “atom bomb” that would topple the balance of powers and neutralize the authority of federal regulators.

Full story

January 19, 2016

The House’s Ideology, in Seven Circles


UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 28: Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., newly elected Chairman of the House Republican Conference, speaks to the media with other House GOP leaders following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., chairwoman of the House Republican Conference, has joined 3 of the GOP’s key groups. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In any organization filled with nothing but ambitious and opinionated people, groups with common interests are sure to come together — and Congress is no different.

Every member’s Hill career begins by winning election to either the House or Senate, of course, and during the 114th Congress all of them are caucusing with either the Republicans or the Democrats. But right below those surfaces, the alliances get much more complex, nuanced — and oftentimes contradictory, as lawmakers subdivide into all manner of smaller clusters. Full story

January 14, 2016

Haley Prompts Ryan to Take Sides in the Fight for GOP’s Soul


UNITED STATES - September 2: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley speaks during a luncheon on her "Lessons from the New South," at the National Press Club in Washington, Wednesday, September 2, 2015. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

UNITED STATES – September 2: South Carolina Gov. Nikki R.  Haley’s State of the Union address drew praise from Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

The passions of the Republican civil war that surfaced because of Gov. Nikki R. Haley’s comments Tuesday night have been trumped by something that for Congress might be even more important:

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, who won the House gavel last fall as the consensus choice of both the combative insurgent conservatives and the cooler-headed establishment mainstream, left no doubt which side he stands with now.

Full story

January 12, 2016

Members Cast as Foils, if Not Spoilers, in Obama’s Final SOTU


UNITED STATES - JANUARY 12 - President Barack Obama speaks during his final State of the Union to a joint session of Congress in the House Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

(Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

“Please don’t get in the way” is one way of synthesizing Tuesday night’s message to Congress from President Barack Obama.

On many of the big things that matter most, he asserted, he’s positioned to leave the country in much better shape than how he found it and how his would-be Republican successors describe it — tacitly urging the Hill’s GOP to resist legislative gamesmanship that while playing into presidential politics might crimp the hopeful trajectory of his final year. Full story

January 5, 2016

David Hawkings’ Whiteboard: State of the Union


State of the Union

(Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

 

One week before President Barack Obama stands before Congress for his last annual address, CQ Roll Call Senior Editor David Hawkings lays out what to expect from this year’s State of the Union.

Full story

January 3, 2016

Could Brokered Convention Yield a Ryan Nomination?


UNITED STATES - AUGUST 30: GOP Vice Presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and GOP Presidential candidate Mitt Romney after Romney's speech at the 2012 Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. (Photo By Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

Ryan, seen here with Romney, right, at the 2012 GOP convention, already has experience on a national ticket. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

During the brief lull in campaign news over the holidays, and with forecasts for the new year popping up on all fronts, folks obsessed with politics could be forgiven for all their idle scenario spinning.

A wave of predictions about at least one brokered convention is a quadrennial flash in the pan. Talk about the Republicans deadlocking in Cleveland come July started more than a month ago. And in recent days, the same climactic plot twist has been envisioned by politically smart people at three successive holiday social gatherings:

Full story

December 16, 2015

The Pelosification of Chuck Schumer


UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 8 - Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., raises his arms as he speaks alongside Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., during the weekly Senate Democrat luncheon news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, December 8, 2015. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Schumer, left, is on his way to being the Republicans’ new bogeyman. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

For those whose lives revolve around the Capitol, the year’s final presidential debate offered two notable insights: Bashing the legislative process remains a pungent applause line, and Republicans may have found their newest liberal boogeyman.

Put another way, all the morning-after assessments of how the candidates performed in Las Vegas overlooked two standouts of particular importance to the congressional class. One of the biggest losers Tuesday night was Congress itself. And one of the biggest winners was, of all people, Charles E. Schumer. Full story

December 15, 2015

Spending Deal a Likely Capstone for a Prominent House Chairman


UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 10: House Appropriations chairman Harold Rogers, R-Ky., speaks with reporters as he leaves the House Republican Conference meeting in the basement of the Capitol on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rogers has shepherded a host of omnibus packages since becoming the House’s top appropriator. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The House’s man of the decade on big budget bills, Harold Rogers, may be in his final days in such a catbird seat.

The Kentuckian has been the top Republican engineer on four consecutive omnibus packages during his chairmanship of the Appropriations Committee. Now he’s on the cusp of completing his fifth, belatedly setting spending levels for a fiscal year with 10 weeks already in the rearview mirror. Full story

December 14, 2015

After the Revolution, a Single New Spot of Influence for the Freedom Caucus


UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 21: Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan., talks with reporters after a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol, October 21 2015. Many questions from reporters were about the likelihood of Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., being elected Speaker of the House. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Huelskamp was the second-highest vote-getter in the Steering Committee election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

If you’re a member of the House Freedom Caucus, are you better off now than you were a dozen weeks ago?

That question is worth asking in light of last week’s down-ballot House Republican leadership election. It was a sort of insiders-only coda to all those months of turmoil in the ranks that climaxed with Speaker John A. Boehner’s resignation announcement at the end of September. Full story

December 10, 2015

Senate and Obama’s Final Round Over Judges


UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 28: Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tn., and Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tn., hold a press conference to talk about their alternatives to the Democrat's approach to solving the "Fiscal Cliff." (Photo By Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

Tennessee’s two GOP senators, Lamar Alexander, left and Bob Corker have signed off on Crenshaw’s nomination, but the nomination is still stalled. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

To predict how the judicial wars between this Republican Senate and President Barack Obama will end, keep an eye on labor lawyer Waverly Crenshaw Jr.

A quarter-century ago, he was the first African-American hired at one of Nashville’s most prominent law firms. Ten months ago, he was chosen for the opening on the local federal trial court. Five months ago, with the blessing of both of Tennessee’s Republican senators, he was endorsed without a dissenting voice in the Senate Judiciary Committee. And since then … nothing, except that as of last week the judgeship had been vacant a full year, and the backlog of cases has grown such that court administrators have declared a “judicial emergency.” Full story

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