Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
August 5, 2015

June 10, 2015

In Budget of Billions, a Fight Over Pennies for Metro

A proposed cut to Metro funding would affect hundreds of thousands of commuters. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Congress’ proposed cut to Metro funding would affect hundreds of thousands of commuters. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

When tracking this year’s inevitable budget crisis, which is showing every early sign of climaxing 16 weeks from now in another shutdown showdown, the Hill community may want to keep Metro in mind.

Even the most seasoned members, staffers, lobbyists and reporters tend to have their eyes glaze over when confronted with appropriations numbers expressed in the multiples of billions and adding up to more than a trillion — so much of it for weapons systems, farm programs, school aid, medical research, prison construction and the like that’s way removed from their own lives.

Full story

June 9, 2015

Passport Case Boosts Obama Foreign Policy Over Hill

The Jerusalem passport case has taken away some of Congress' power. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Supreme Court ruling on the Jerusalem passport case takes away some of Congress’ power. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congress has decisively lost to the president in the year’s most consequential balance-of-powers dispute before the Supreme Court.

The president must have exclusive power to formally recognize the government of another nation, the court declared Monday in a 6-3 decision both sides predicted would shift influence over American foreign policy away from the Capitol and push more of it toward the White House. Full story

June 8, 2015

Going to the Baseball Game? Sit in the Middle

Staffer fans cheer for their preferred party at the Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Staffer fans cheer for their preferred party at the Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

It’s not too late to make plans to be part of one of the great set pieces of a Washington summer.

The 54th Annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game is Thursday night. Attending can be a fine antidote for much of the toxic polarization suffusing the Capitol Hill work day, a tonic for cleansing the political mind of ideologically combative thoughts.

Full story

June 4, 2015

Chafee Makes His Quirky Case for President

Chafee, seen here at the Democratic National Convention in 2012, is a most unusual presidential candidate. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Chafee, at the Democratic National Convention in 2012, is an unusual candidate. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

It has all the early hallmarks of the most curious, quirky, counterintuitive presidential quest by a former member of Congress in a long time. Those who’ve tracked Lincoln Chafee’s strange career would be surprised if it were any other way.

Most politicians time their candidacy announcements for maximum coverage, and pick a setting relevant to their life story or their rationale for running. But the scion of one of New England’s oldest families chose to formalize his intentions during the peak of Wednesday night’s rush hour at George Mason University, a sprawling commuter school in the Northern Virginia suburbs. Full story

June 3, 2015

Hastert’s Past Informs Boehner’s Disciplined Course

Hastert, right, and Boehner, seen here in 2009, have very different speakership styles. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Hastert, right, and Boehner, seen here in 2009, have very different speakership styles. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Maybe one thing would be more shocking to Hill long-timers than the lurid criminal charges confronting the previous Republican speaker of the House: A personal scandal taking down the current Republican speaker of the House.

John A. Boehner has worked assiduously to bring a glass-house lifestyle to the Capitol. He’s been a dogmatic behind-the-scenes disciplinarian with GOP colleagues who have lost their moral bearings. So it’s almost impossible to imagine he’d get caught in the same sort of misbehavior for which he’s shown zero tolerance among the troops. Full story

June 2, 2015

Politicians Prosecuting Their Case to Come to Congress

Brooks is one of the prosecutors serving in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Brooks is one of the prosecutors serving in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If three in a row signals a trend, then the era of the prosecutor in congressional politics is clearly taking hold.

The first person sent to the House by special election this year, Dan Donovan, was starting his 12th year as the elected district attorney on New York’s Staten Island. The winner of the second such contest, on Tuesday, is very likely to be fellow Republican Trent Kelly, who was elected DA for seven counties in northern Mississippi in 2012 and before that was city prosecutor in Tupelo for 11 years. The next special election isn’t until September, in downstate Illinois, but the clear favorite is Darin LaHood, who spent almost a decade as a state and federal prosecutor before becoming a GOP state senator five years ago.

Full story

May 21, 2015

Members Living in Their Offices Rent-Free Adds Up

Member of Congress who sleep in their offices are getting a nice little taxpayer benefit. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Member of Congress who sleep in their offices are effectively getting a little taxpayer benefit. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Joaquin Castro knows a little about real estate, in part because his twin, Julian, is secretary of Housing and Urban Development. So after winning a safely Democratic seat three years ago, he decided buying a condo on the Hill was a smart investment.

He soon started noticing, when walking home at night, how many windows in the darkened House office buildings emanated a distinctive bluish light. Castro guesses the number of his colleagues inside, watching TV while falling asleep, has only grown and easily tops 50 these days.

“I’ve been joking with my brother,” the San Antonio congressman says with a broad grin, “that he should have HUD designate this place a public housing project.” Full story

May 20, 2015

Member Pay Freeze Likely to Last Close to a Decade

Congressional salaries aren't going up any time soon. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional salaries aren’t going up any time soon. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As one of their final acts before the Memorial Day break, members of Congress have begun their annual ritual combining financial self-flagellation with electoral self-preservation.

The burst of loud whining from a cluster of safe-seat members — “We aren’t being paid properly!” complains 12th-term Democratic Rep. Alcee L. Hastings of South Florida — didn’t slow things down a bit.

The House passed the annual legislative branch spending bill Tuesday, with language extending the congressional salary freeze for a seventh consecutive year. On the very safe assumption the Senate agrees, the measure will assure the longest period in half a century members will go without a raise.

Full story

May 18, 2015

Capitol Hill’s Women Hold Power Beyond Numbers

Women are on the rise in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Women are on the rise in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Almost every congressional campaign season opens with the potential for some political firsts. And, with just a few words uttered on the West Coast last week, this cycle has already made a bit of history and will have a shot at making even more.

For the first time, two women are alone as the main competitors to become the same political party’s Senate candidate of choice. That much was guaranteed with the decision by Rep. Loretta Sanchez to enter the race for California’s open seat, where her principal opponent will be another Democrat, state Attorney General Kamala Harris. And if Sanchez ends up the winner in November 2016, she would become the nation’s first Latina senator. Full story

May 14, 2015

Carper’s High-Test Week, on Two Very Different Tracks

Carper was one of the Democrats summoned to the White House to resurrect the trade deal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Carper was one of the Democrats summoned to the White House to resurrect the trade deal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Thomas R. Carper is having one heck of a week.

Even the most soft-spoken congressional workhorse can expect to end up with an occasional moment in the spotlight. Rarely does a senator with as low a profile as the Delaware Democrat end up in the national headlines twice in a few hours — and for two totally different reasons.

Full story

May 13, 2015

Trade Votes of Past Point to Obama’s Troubles Ahead

Brown, left, and Merkley joined with all but one Democrat to block fast track trade legislation from moving forward. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic senators such as Sherrod Brown, left, and Jeff Merkley joined with all but one Democrat to block fast-track trade legislation from moving forward. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s too soon to label the first test vote in the great trade debate of 2015 as a harbinger of total collapse ahead. But the prognosticators, the party whips and the president already have some tally sheets providing strong evidence of a cliffhanger in the making.

Congress last approved similar legislation 13 years ago, which of course is a lifetime in rhythms of the place. Still, two messages may fairly be inferred from the positions taken back then by the lawmakers who remain in office today. Full story

May 10, 2015

After Supercharged Start, Tom Cotton Stands Alone (Video)

Cotton heads to the Senate amid the Iran debate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Cotton heads to the Senate amid the Iran debate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tom Cotton marks two milestones this week. As of Monday, more than half of his senatorial career will have elapsed (63 days!) since his pugilistic letter warning Iran against cutting a nuclear deal with the Obama administration. And Wednesday is the Arkansas Republican’s 38th birthday, another reminder he’s the youngest senator in two decades.

Those twin occasions provide an opportunity to note just how unusually hot and fast Cotton’s start has been. Even in a Senate where newcomers no longer feel obligated to bide their time or defer to their elders, as they did for so much of history, just four months of combativeness may have determined the personality of Cotton’s entire congressional life — no matter how long it lasts. Full story

May 5, 2015

New Congress, New Round in Senate Fight Over Obama’s Judges (Video)

Where's the blue slip, Toomey? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Toomey says he supports Restrepo, but has held off officially signing off on the judge’s nomination. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In the long-running judicial wars between the Senate and the White House, the first skirmish of the year is flaring into the open this week.

How it plays out will offer insight about whether the new Republican majority plans to continue making the federal bench a venue for venting displeasure with President Barack Obama, or whether he’ll be allowed to refashion the courts a bit more during his final two years in office. Full story

April 30, 2015

Sanders Asks Democrats to Pick Proud Non-Democrat

The Sanders 2016 bid is Democratic in just one way. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sanders 2016 is Democratic in just one way. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:05 a.m. | When Bernard Sanders declared his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, he joined a lengthening roster of gadflies who have run in order to push the party to the left.

So will it matter that he is not now, never has been and does not plan to become an actual Democrat? Full story

April 29, 2015

What Gay Marriage Briefs Tell Us About Congress

Supreme Court Gay Marriage Hearing

Which members of Congress have gotten involved with the SCOTUS gay marriage case? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Though only a few lawmakers participated in the rallies during Tuesday’s oral arguments, more than half the members of Congress had already formalized their views on the same-sex marriage cases before the Supreme Court.

A review of the congressional signatures on three friend-of-the-court briefs revealed an important political narrative underneath the historic story about the future of American society. And that’s the fact almost all the Democrats facing heated re-election races next year have told the court they believe gays and lesbians have a constitutional right to get married. Almost all the Republicans looking at competitive campaigns decided to steer clear of the question. Full story

Sign In

Forgot password?

Or

Subscribe

Receive daily coverage of the people, politics and personality of Capitol Hill.

Subscription | Free Trial

Logging you in. One moment, please...