Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
February 6, 2016

November 17, 2015

Two Veteran Chairmen in Forefront After Paris Attacks


paris attacks

McCaul arrives in the Longworth Building last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

After the Sept. 11 attacks, the most famous moment when terrorism instantly replaced the economy as the congressional agenda item, editors here struggled to assemble a list of 28 lawmakers prepared to take ownership of the Hill’s new mission.

Nineteen of them have left in the intervening 14 years, making way for a new generation of members driving debates about foreign intelligence, international relations, military defense and domestic protection policies. And because of the Republican takeover of the Senate in 2014 and House GOP term limits, six of the eight committees that will take the lead in shaping the congressional response to the Islamic State got new chairmen this year.

The situation stands to focus extra attention in the weeks ahead on the pair in the House who have held their gavels two years longer than the rest: Michael McCaul of Texas at Homeland Security and Ed Royce of California at Foreign Relations. Full story

November 15, 2015

House Conservative Favorite Eyes Unusual Career Switch


trey gowdy

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The path from the legislative to the executive branch is as well-worn as usual, with five senators and a former senator now hoping to succeed another onetime senator as president and 15 former members joining the Cabinets of the Obama and George Bush administrations.

The route between the legislative and judicial branches, by contrast, is as weeded-over as it’s ever been. No one has gone from Congress to the federal bench in 30 years, and the last Supreme Court justice with any congressional experience retired in 1971.

The natures of those political trajectories might not remain as diametrically different for all that much longer. Full story

November 5, 2015

David Hawkings’ Whiteboard: Wealth of Congress


Alongside the release of Roll Call’s annual Wealth of Congress Index, CQ Roll Call Senior Editor David Hawkings discusses how members’ net worth has changed over the years, and how so many of them became so rich in the first place.

Full story

What the 2016 Calendar Says About Congress


Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agree on at least one thing: a long August recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agree on at least one thing: a long August recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Decades of waiting on the arrival of the annual congressional calendar and then poring over the details affords Hill long-timers a nuanced appreciation of the myriad political calculations and logistical limitations that go in to setting the Capitol’s timetable for an entire year.

Inside the stretches of legislating followed by the bursts of recess, the schedules for 2016 announced this week by the Republican top brass in the House and Senate offer some quirky rhythms and unexpected sequences that give insight into the hectic election year ahead. Here are five messages delivered by the new diary. Full story

November 4, 2015

The Ryan Rule: Whose Portrait Is Next?


From left, Pelosi, Rep. Eric Cantor, Boehner, and Hastert at Hastert's portrait unveiling in 2009. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

From left, Pelosi, Rep. Eric Cantor, Boehner, and Hastert at Hastert’s portrait unveiling in 2009. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Just days into the job, Speaker Paul D. Ryan has now made two decisions that deliver a powerful signal about how he’ll be the institutional steward of the House.

First, by declaring he’ll keep sleeping in his office, and now by having J. Dennis Hastert’s ceremonial portrait carted off to oblivion, Ryan is sending a clear message about his priorities: Trying for a short-term boost in the abysmal reputation of Congress — by using symbolic gestures that are easy for the electorate to understand — is more important than shielding the long-term reputation and historical stature of the legislative branch. Full story

November 3, 2015

The Mixed Symbolism of Paul Ryan Sleeping in His Office


UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 28: Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., leaves a  House Republican Conference meeting in Longworth Building where he was nominated as their Speaker of the House candidate, October 28, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Ryan has no intention of paying rent off campus. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Many colorful “firsts” are accompanying Paul D. Ryan into the speakership. Most are distinctions from his past he can do nothing to alter: The only Wisconsinite to ever preside over the House, the first who’s been Ways and Means chairman, waited tables on Capitol Hill or toiled as a House staffer.

There’s one symbolically important aspect of his present life, however, that’s also unprecedented among House speakers — and that he may be pressed to change:

He sleeps in his office. Full story

October 27, 2015

Marco Rubio’s Long Senate Goodbye


One and done. Rubio is not running for re-election, opting to pursue the presidency instead. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

One and done. Rubio is not running for re-election, opting to pursue the presidency instead. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Most lawmakers approach life in Congress as they would a functional marriage: The decision to go down the road is taken with great care, the thrill of the new is soon supplanted by hard work and sacrifice in pursuit of lasting gratification — and it’s painful whenever things don’t work out, for whatever reason.

Marco Rubio has decided his congressional career is more akin to a nascent relationship, where “love it or leave it” is an appropriate default setting. Full story

October 26, 2015

The Would-Be Chairman With Ways and Means on His Side


Brady announced Monday he's running for Ways and Means chairman. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Brady announced Monday he’s running for Ways and Means chairman. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Assuming no more last-minute surprises this fall at the House Republican Conference, the only important personnel decision to be made in coming days is who’ll become chairman of the Ways and Means Committee.

Paul D. Ryan’s agreement to be speaker, to be formally embraced by his GOP colleagues Wednesday, means after just 10 months he must give up the job he’s always described as his top political ambition.

Kevin Brady of Texas announced Monday he wants to be the next to run the House’s most important panel, which writes tax, trade, health care and social safety net legislation. Pat Tiberi of Ohio declared his candidacy last week. Full story

October 25, 2015

The Freedom Caucus Filibuster, Explained


House Freedom Caucus

Freedom Caucus members Jim Jordan and Raúl R. Labrador descend the Capitol steps on Oct. 21. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“If it wasn’t for the filibuster, he’d still be the speaker today.”

That out-of-the-box theory was unspooled the other day by the ultra-right wing Rep. Trent Franks of Arizona. In his view, Speaker John A. Boehner’s agenda was sufficiently conservative to merit the good graces of almost all the most confrontational House Republicans and their like-minded constituents. But Boehner’s commitment to the cause, Franks posited, got unfairly overlooked because so little legislation got through Congress. Full story

October 22, 2015

Ryan Sacrifices Job Security With Eye Toward Long Game


One and done for Ryan? (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

One and done for Ryan? (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

What’s the best job security Paul D. Ryan can hope for, even if the Republican malcontents hold their fire long enough and he becomes speaker of the House?

That would be one year. Fourteen months, at the outside. Full story

October 21, 2015

Daniel Webster Presses Nuanced Case for Speaker


Webster, center, is a long-shot candidate for speaker, but that hasn't deterred him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Webster, center, is a long-shot candidate for speaker, but that hasn’t deterred him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Daniel Webster made clear over the past two weeks he wasn’t waiting on Paul D. Ryan’s big decision. And on Thursday, the relatively obscure Florida congressman reiterated he is still running for speaker, no matter what.

He’ll continue his quest, he said in a terse statement, “to transform a broken Congress based on the power of a few into a principle-based, member-driven Congress.”

The rationale for his long-shot candidacy is more complex than how he’s being marketed: As the preferred candidate of the House Freedom Caucus, Webster has the favor of 40 or so of the most conservative Republicans, a bloc of support no leader of today’s House can hope to govern without.

In fact, the 66-year-old lawmaker from Orlando’s career in public life has made him something of a Rorschach test for his Republican colleagues. Full story

October 20, 2015

Gridlock Greets Mondale on Return to D.C.


Mondale visited the Capitol in January. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Mondale visited the Capitol in January. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Tuesday’s symposium on the legacy of Walter Mondale, the former vice president and power-player senator, offers a fresh rationale for considering a smartly argued report that’s gone largely overlooked in all this fall’s congressional news.

The white paper, released last month by the nonprofit and nonpartisan Partnership for Public Service, concludes that congressional polarization has spread gridlock so widely and deeply beyond the Capitol that it’s gummed up the works significantly for the executive branch as well. Full story

October 19, 2015

David Hawkings’ Whiteboard: Continuing Resolutions


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CQ Roll Call Senior Editor David Hawkings breaks down Congress’ favorite budgetary procrastination tool: the continuing resolution.

Full story

October 18, 2015

Clinton Better Bring A-Game to Benghazi Hearing


UNITED STATES - JANUARY 23: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the September 11th attacks against the U.S. mission in Benghazi on  Wednesday morning, January 23, 2013. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Clinton testified during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the Benghazi attacks on Jan. 23, 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The year’s most important congressional hearing is at hand — not only because momentum in a presidential election is in play, but also because the legislative branch’s ability to conduct serious oversight is on the line.

On both fronts, the power to shape the public’s perception Thursday rests with Hillary Rodham Clinton. And, whatever else about her behavior and ideology remains open to passionate disagreement, this much looks clear: With a single glaring exception, she has made an exceptionally effective witness during her 31 previous appearances before Congress, dating back more than two decades. Full story

October 10, 2015

Next Speaker Unlikely to Continue Long String of Leadership Insiders


Ryan, right, has policy chops but scant leadership experience. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Ryan, right, has policy chops but scant leadership experience. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated Oct. 13, 12 p.m. | There may be plenty of good reasons why Republicans are now seeking a “fresh face” as House speaker. But picking from outside the existing chain of command would also create some big challenges.

It also would be highly unusual. It’s been nearly a century since someone was chosen to preside over the House without ever occupying a lower rung in the leadership. The past 16 speakers, in other words, have won with serious insider credentials — even when political common sense has pointed to the selection of a certified outsider. Full story

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