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January 31, 2015

Posts in "Around Washington"

January 30, 2015

Jim Moran Doesn’t Miss Congress

Moran starts with McDermott on Feb. 2. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Moran starts with McDermott Will & Emery on Feb. 2. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For the record, ex-Rep. James P. Moran doesn’t miss Congress. At least, “not yet.”

Perhaps it’s because, after sparking a national debate by arguing that lawmakers on Capitol Hill are “underpaid,” he is launching into the lucrative world of lobbying.

Full story

5 Potential Scenarios for D.C.’s Marijuana Initiative

What's next for marijuana in D.C.? (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

What’s next for marijuana in D.C.? (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The ongoing battle over the District of Columbia’s marijuana policy is currently at a standstill, but several scenarios over the coming weeks could alter its fate.

In November, 70 percent of D.C. voters approved Initiative 71, legalizing the possession and cultivation of small amounts of marijuana. But Congress moved to block the initiative by attaching a rider to the year-end spending package barring federal and local funds from being used “to enact any law, rule, or regulation to legalize or reduce penalties associated with the possession, use or distribution.” Full story

January 26, 2015

Getting Beyond Budget Scorekeeper’s Perennial ‘Pissing Contest’

Former CBO acting director Donald Marron, a potential Elemendorf successor, testifies during 2006 Senate Budget hearing. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Former CBO acting Director Marron, a potential Elmendorf successor, testifies during Senate Budget Committee hearing in 2006. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Can the new director of the Congressional Budget Office get “beyond the basic pissing contest” of how to score legislation? The former heads of the official scorekeeping agency hope so.

As Washington awaits the identity of a new CBO director, fiscal policy wonks are delving into a pending rule change that will require Douglas W. Elmendorf’s successor to incorporate a contentious way of estimating economic effects into the official price tags of major pieces of legislation.

Full story

January 23, 2015

U.S. Conference of Mayors Moving Past Congressional Gridlock

Bowser, left, was among the mayors discussing policy at the U.S. Conference of Mayors meeting. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Bowser, left, was among the mayors discussing policy at the U.S. Conference of Mayors meeting. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Mayors from across the nation have a message for Congress: Gridlock means mayors have had to pick up the slack.

Nearly 300 mayors from across the country, and from both parties, descended on the District of Columbia following President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address for the 83rd annual U.S. Conference of Mayors’ winter meeting. Up for discussion in particular were new ways federal and local governments can get things done. Full story

January 22, 2015

Lawmakers Define Oversight Role in L’Enfant Metro Incident

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Members of Congress are looking to flex their oversight muscles, after summoning national and local transportation officials to Capitol Hill on Wednesday evening to brief them on the recent deadly incident at the L’Enfant Plaza Metro Station.

Although the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating and the D.C. government is becoming involved, members of the capital region delegation insisted they, too, have a role to play.

Full story

January 14, 2015

Lawmakers Demand Answers About Deadly L’Enfant Metro Incident (Updated)

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 4:14 p.m. | The deadly incident at the L’Enfant Plaza Metro Station Monday has raised questions about the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s emergency response procedures, and has some members of Congress demanding answers.

On Monday afternoon, a Yellow Line train from L’Enfant Plaza came to a halt inside the tunnel and the train and tunnel filled with smoke, killing one woman and hospitalizing dozens more.  In the wake of the accident, federal lawmakers from the capital region were demanding answers, and they could have more details on the National Transportation Safety Board’s investigation next week. Full story

January 13, 2015

L’Enfant Metro Incident Raises Questions About D.C. Emergency Response

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

(CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Monday’s L’Enfant Plaza Metro incident has raised questions about Metro’s response to the situation, whether swifter action could have prevented the injuries and how Washington’s vast law enforcement network communicates in an underground transit disaster.

On Monday afternoon, a Yellow-line train from L’Enfant Plaza came to a halt inside the tunnel and the station and train filled with smoke, killing one woman and hospitalizing dozens more. Full story

January 9, 2015

Police Supporters Planning ‘Sea of Blue’ March on Capitol

Thousands of protesters marched in Washington against police violence on Dec. 13. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thousands of protesters marched in Washington against police violence on Dec. 13. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Hundreds of police officers are expected to converge on the Capitol later this month, in a rally planned to show support for law enforcement and counter what organizers view as an anti-police climate.

Three officers’ wives are coordinating the Jan. 17 “End the Madness” event, also referred to as “Sea of Blue,” in coordination with the Fraternal Order of Police lodges in the District of Columbia and Prince George’s County. They say the peaceful action is not really a response to the protests against police-involved killings that have marched through D.C., though their language echoes the “black lives matter” slogan of those demonstrators. Full story

January 8, 2015

D.C. Loses 2024 Olympics Bid

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton

Bowser said the failed 2024 DC Olympics bid could help make the case for infrastructure investments. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Washington, D.C. has lost its bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics, with the U.S. Olympic Committee instead announcing Thursday evening that it has selected Boston.

The announcement is a blow to D.C. residents and officials who were hoping to host the Summer Olympics, though D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser tried to bring a positive perspective to the news.

“Despite today’s outcome, I am proud of how the District and the region presented,” Bowser said in a statement. “I want to thank the talented and hardworking Washingtonians whose efforts got us to the short list of American cities.”

Full story

Capito Mourns Her Father, Former Gov. and Rep. Arch Moore (Updated)

Sen. Moore, left, in a 1999 picture with her father. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Moore, left, in a 1999 picture with her father. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated Jan. 9, 6:53 p.m. | Former West Virginia Gov. and Rep. Arch Moore, the father of newly sworn in Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., died in Charleston on Wednesday. He was 91.

Moore was first elected to the House in 1956 and served six terms before being elected governor in 1968. The Republican won re-election in 1972 and, after an unsuccessful bid for the Senate in 1978 against Democrat Jennings Randolph, was elected to the governor’s mansion again in 1984. He was defeated for re-election in 1988. Full story

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