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February 14, 2016

Posts in "NRCC"

January 11, 2016

NRCC Names Furst Johnson IE Director


07/12/05.U.S. BORDER SECURITY--Rep. Katherine Harris, R-Fla.,testifies before Senate Foreign Relations on border security. Other witnesses were Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. McCain has been working on a bill with Kennedy that would offer limited guest worker visas. He said Arlen Specter, R-Pa., chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, is ready to hold hearings on both proposals. Cornyn and Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., have filed an amendment providing a comprehensive set of immigration changes. The amendment would give the federal government more power to remove illegal aliens from the country quickly and allow the government to revoke visas for suspicious immigrants. Among other provisions, the amendment also would require the Homeland Security Department to issue documents to aliens that can be verified through fingerprints or other means. Harris is sponsoring border security legislation in the House..CONGRESSIONAL QUARTERLY PHOTO BY SCOTT J. FERRELL

Furst Johnson was communications director for former Rep. Katherine Harris’ 2004 campaign. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

National Republican Congressional Committee Deputy Executive Director and General Counsel Jessica Furst Johnson will be the committee’s Independent Expenditure Director for the 2016 cycle.

“Jessica was instrumental in helping us win our historic Republican majority in 2014 and we are excited she will lead our IE unit in 2016,” said NRCC Executive Director Rob Simms in a release first obtained by Roll Call.

Full story

December 4, 2015

Illinois Filing Deadline Passes, Along With 2 Democratic Takeover Opportunities


UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 19: Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., walks down the House steps in the rain as members of Congress head home for the Thanksgiving recess following the final votes on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Davis appears to be in better shape next year than when he narrowly won last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 3:20 p.m. | It’s not even 2016 yet, but the filing deadline for candidates in Illinois came and went on Tuesday. Democrats failed to recruit top-tier candidates in two competitive districts, which means the map Democrats drew after the last census will fall short of its desired intent once again.

In the last round of redistricting, Democratic majorities in the state Legislature redrew the congressional map to favor Democratic candidates, and the party controlled two-thirds of the delegation (12 of 18 districts) after the 2012 elections. The only Democratic or swing district that Democrats didn’t win was the 13th, where Republican Rodney Davis won a narrow victory.

Full story

December 3, 2015

New Florida Lines Change Outlook in 5 House Races


UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 3: Rep. Daniel Webster, R-Fla., listens during the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Railroads, Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Subcommittee hearing on "How the Changing Energy Markets Will Affect U.S. Transportation" on Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Florida’s new congressional map makes Webster’s 10th District decidedly more Democrat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

After years of court battles, the Florida Supreme Court finally decided on a new congressional map that changes the dynamic in a handful of districts.

The results must be bittersweet for Democrats, who have been crying for “fair districts” for quite some time and could net as many as three seats in Florida next year. But they will also likely lose one of their stars, freshman Democratic Rep. Gwen Graham, whose 2nd District is now so Republican that it’s hard to see her even attempting to run for re-election.

Full story

November 23, 2015

Time to Stop Reporting on Committee Fundraising Numbers


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Sen. Jon Tester, left, heads the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and Sen. Roger Wicker, right, is chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 4:40 p.m. | Political reporters have a fever and the only prescription appears to be fundraising numbers.

It’s a time-honored tradition: Every month, the House and Senate campaign committees release fundraising totals in a regular effort to claim momentum and financial supremacy, and political reporters can’t resist the temptation to report them.

Full story

November 13, 2015

House Retirement Rush Still Short of Average


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Lummis announced Thursday that she would retire at the end of this term. (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

 

In spite of the recent rush of retirement announcements, this Congress is still below the historical average of exits each cycle, which means more House retirements are likely to come.

Wyoming Republican Cynthia M. Lummis, California Democrat Sam Farr and Texas Democrat Rubén Hinojosa capped off the week by announcing they will not seek re-election next year. The trio makes 14 members who are leaving the House without seeking another office in 2016, according to Roll Call’s Casualty List.

Full story

October 28, 2015

Don’t Blame Gerrymandering for GOP Civil War


UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 29: Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, leaves the House Republican Conference meeting in the basement of the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Some believe that Boehner’s run as speaker was a victim of redistricting, but that’s not the whole story. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Blame the earmark ban or Republican leaders. Blame Ted Cruz or even Justin Bieber. But don’t blame gerrymandering for the fighting in the House.

As Republicans labor through replacing Speaker John A. Boehner, bemoaning redistricting has become a common refrain in explaining the GOP civil war.

Full story

October 22, 2015

Pelosi Sees a Wave; Strategists Say it’s Just a Ripple Now


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Pelosi says pollsters are telling her they see the “prospects of a wave” next year. (Photo by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats don’t need to find themselves a cheerleader. They already have Nancy Pelosi.

“I think the Democrats could have the gavel in 18 months,” she told Texas Tribune reporter/Roll Call alum Abby Livingston recently. “Here’s the thing: I’m always optimistic. You have to be.”

Full story

By Nathan L. Gonzales Posted at 3:06 p.m.
DCCC, House, NRCC

October 19, 2015

John Boehner Shouldn’t Pack His Bags Just Yet


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There’s a real possibility that Boehner’s self-imposed deadline could pass without a successor. (Photo by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:28 p.m. | Speaker John A. Boehner plans to leave Congress at the end of October, but Republican infighting threatens to keep him around longer, particularly if Wisconsin Rep. Paul D. Ryan declines a run to replace him.

According to a source with knowledge of his remarks, Boehner told the House Republican conference on Oct. 9, the final day before the week-long recess, that “stepping down before we elect a new speaker would hurt the institution.” Full story

By Nathan L. Gonzales Posted at 1:31 p.m.
House, NRCC, Ohio

August 26, 2015

Parties Play Politics With FEC Complaints


UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 31: FEC Commissioner Lee Goodman makes a statement during his first meeting at the Commission's downtown office, as Chair Ellen Weintraub, and Commissioner Ann Ravel, look on. It was the first meeting attended by Ravel and Goodman. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

FEC Commissioner Lee Goodman makes a statement as then-Chairwoman Ellen Weintraub, and then-Commissioner Ann Ravel listen. (File Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Ethics problems can be serious trouble for any politician, but party strategists often use Federal Election Committee complaints to play games with the opposition, because the allegation has a slim chance of being ruled on before Election Day.

“Everyone knows both sides file complaints to get press hits,” one campaign strategist said anonymously in order to speak candidly.

Full story

May 27, 2015

14 Open House Seats, Few Takeover Opportunities


The retiring Fitzpatrick leaves behind one of the few competitive open seats. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The retiring Fitzpatrick leaves behind one of the few competitive open seats in Pennsylvania’s 8th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

More than 90 percent of House incumbents routinely get re-elected, so open seats are a hot commodity. Five months into the 114th Congress, 14 House members have announced their departure, but just four of the seats they are leaving behind can be considered competitive.

At this stage in the cycle, Republicans have two vulnerable open seats: Chris Gibson’s 19th District in New York and Michael G. Fitzpatrick’s 8th District in Pennsylvania. President Barack Obama carried Gibson’s district twice and Fitzpatrick’s district once, in 2008, but both incumbents locked down their turf to the point where Democrats didn’t put up much of a fight last cycle.

Full story

May 7, 2015

Parties Divide and Conquer Independent Spending


Walden is chairing the NRCC for a second time this cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Walden is chairing the NRCC for a second time this cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Having more than $50 million to spend on House races in the final months of the campaign may sound like fun, but both campaign committees have figured out it’s not a one-person job.

Each election cycle, the National Republican Congressional Committee and Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee designate a trusted operative who will eventually be walled off from the official committee to direct the independent expenditure effort. Full story

April 28, 2015

House Playing Field Is Small, but Can Change


Elections 2016

Israel, left, led House Democrats’ campaign efforts the last two cycles. Luján is chairing the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee for 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With a year and a half to go before the 2016 elections, the House playing field is too small for Democrats to retake the majority. But there is time for the cycle to develop in favor of down-ballot Democratic candidates and for the number of competitive seats to grow. Full story

By Nathan L. Gonzales Posted at 11:45 a.m.
DCCC, House, NRCC

January 16, 2015

When a House Member Should Retire


Rothenberg Political Report

Gibson announced his retirement Jan. 6. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If you’re a member of Congress thinking about retiring, you might want to spend some time listening to Kenny Rogers.

“You gotta know when to hold’em. Know when to fold’em. Know when to walk away. Know when to run,” sang the country music legend in his 1978 song, “The Gambler.” Full story

January 13, 2015

Can Democrats Win the House in 2016?


Rothenberg Political Report

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats have a better chance of winning control of the House next year than they did at any time in 2014. That’s true even though they now need to gain 30 seats, almost twice what they needed last year.

No, I’m not suggesting Democrats will win the House in 2016. Far from it. Right now, you’d need a magnifying glass, probably even a microscope, to find the party’s chances of taking control. Full story

August 6, 2014

Inside House Democrats’ Expanding Ground Game


In the face of a challenging midterm environment, Democrats are relying on money and an expanding get-out-the-vote effort to avoid losing any more ground in the House. But what does that souped-up ground game look like?

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s fundraising advantage over the National Republican Congressional Committee is well-documented by this point. And DCCC Chairman Steve Israel said his party plans to out-organize Republicans in the fall.

The DCCC has 444 field staff on the ground in 48 districts, according to an official spokesperson, with another 219 scheduled to start later this month. The committee started August with at least 20 field staff in 11 districts.

The field effort is starting earlier than in previous cycles. The first permanent staffer started in early January in a competitive California district, which is about six months earlier than before. Full story

By Nathan L. Gonzales Posted at 12:07 p.m.
DCCC, House, NRCC

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