Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
October 1, 2014

GOP Can’t Catch a Break in Congressional Baseball Recruitment

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Democrats won the Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game again this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Phil Berger Jr.’s loss in Tuesday’s Republican runoff in North Carolina’s 6th District was about more than an establishment favorite getting knocked off by an anti-establishment challenger.

He could have been a key player for Republicans in future Roll Call Congressional Baseball Games.

According to multiple sources, Berger was expected to infuse the Republican Conference with some talent in next year’s 54th Annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game. He was even talked about as a potential pitcher.

The GOP needed it, considering Democrats are on a six-game winning streak. This year, Democrats defeated Republicans, 15-6.

Berger threw out the first pitch just last week at a Greensboro Grasshoppers minor league game, but it’s unclear from the photos how much Republicans will actually be missing.

Berger’s primary foe, Rev. Mark Walker, threw out the first pitch a night earlier for the same Miami Marlins Single-A affiliate. And judging strictly by the photos, Republicans may still get a player (and potential pitcher) out of the deal.

Republican reinforcements may also be on the way from Pennsylvania’s 6th District.

Chester County Commissioner Ryan Costello is the favorite to keep retiring Rep. Jim Gerlach’s seat in Republican hands this fall. The Rothenberg Political Report/Roll Call rates the race as Lean Republican for now.

In a recent candidate interview, Costello revealed that he could potentially pitch for the GOP next year. The 37 year-old Republican played more basketball and soccer as he got older, but he played baseball until he was 15, including a Babe Ruth state championship, and could provide the caucus with some younger depth on the mound.

  • YONATAN C

    the government seems to have forgotten all about the three million unemployed families that are still without an unemployment extension since late last December. while the congress approved billions of dollars for the Ukraine, and approved the Koch brothers oil pipeline bill, the unemployment extension bill was refused passage by the republican senate. both political parties have failed these unemployed families, and left them in financial ruin and deep poverty.

  • http://washingtonspectacle.com Robert Price Rifkin

    So,,,Maybe It’s Time to Limit Presidential Terms

    Being president of the United States is a lot like
    being the neighborhood used car salesman. You may be very good at what you do;
    you may have graduated from the Senate or the State house with all kinds of
    experience and knowledge and friends; you may be wildly popular at the time of
    the election. I talk about this on my political weblog
    http://www.washingtonspectacle.com.

    But it’s that rare president who manages to keep the
    allegiance of the voters after the first 365 days in office. There’s something
    inherently rotten in the set up. Let’s face it, even the most accomplished of
    men and women seem to be no match for the kind of work that demands the right decision
    one hundred per cent of the time. They don’t call it the World’s Toughest Job
    for no reason. It’s not just tough, it’s incomprehensibly impossible to pull
    off with any real measure of success.

    Name the two or three best presidents in the last
    fifty years, then look closely at their records and their poll numbers. Reagan
    suffered in office, Bush suffered in office, Clinton suffered in office–they
    all did; they all had wide swings in popularity and long, drawn-out, awful
    periods of challenge they just didn’t seem up to. Iran-Contra, Monicagate,
    Iraq. Yet all of these presidents were around for eight years, two terms, an
    eternity in political years. And maybe that’s the problem.

    We let our Chief Execs hangs around long past their
    sell-by dates and that’s no one’s fault but our own, because we could change the
    law that lets them do that. It wouldn’t be an easy process but maybe its time
    to consider the efficacy of just such a sweeping modification to our
    Constitution.

    Four years in the kind of high-pressure cooker that
    is the White House is more than enough for any reasonable, solid citizen. You
    can only ask so much of your public servants and four years is about right. If
    you have any doubts about that, take a look at the second terms of even our
    most accomplished presidents. Second terms are infamous for the toll they take
    on our leaders, the psychological and emotional tax. In the recent past, there
    no longer seems to be any such thing as a successful second act in the
    president business. It’s just a fact.

    Maybe it’s time to give out those mandatory fifth
    year vacations. We’d all probably feel refreshed. That is, if we can figure out
    a way to stop those three year presidential campaigns…

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