Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
October 31, 2014

Posts in "Intellectual Property"

October 24, 2014

Weekly Wrapup: Spectrum Incentive Auction, ECPA & Online Sales Tax Bill

Among some of the news in tech policy this week: the Federal Communications Commission announced a delay of the spectrum incentive auction as well as a pause on its 180-day review of the proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable and AT&T-DirecTV transactions. In case you missed it, Technocrat had posts on Sen. Orrin G. Hatch‘s call for enactment of legislation targeting abusive patent litigation and changes to electronic privacy law next Congress as well as the state of play on the online sales tax bill.

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October 21, 2014

Hatch Calls for ECPA, ‘Patent Troll’ Legislation in Next Congress

 

hatch002 0514131 445x287 Hatch Calls for ECPA, Patent Troll Legislation in Next Congress

Sen. Orrin Hatch the leaves the Senate side carriage entrance of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In prepared remarks for a speech Tuesday detailing a wide-ranging “innovation agenda” for the next Congress, Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, called for enactment of legislation targeting abusive patent litigation as well as changes to electronic privacy law.

In his written remarks for a speech at Overstock.com in Salt Lake City, Utah, the Utah Republican said about a patent litigation bill: “I intend to do everything in my power next Congress to pass such legislation.”

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October 17, 2014

Weekly Wrapup: Encryption, Patent Office and Robots

FBI Director James B. Comey’s remarks on encryption and law enforcement access to data, the nomination of Michelle K. Lee to head the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and a Q&A on robots and the law were among the highlights from the last few days. Check out the Mid-Week Catchup for happenings from earlier this week.

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October 10, 2014

Friday Q&A: DiMA’s Gregory Alan Barnes

Greg Barnes photo 106x240 Friday Q&A: DiMAs Gregory Alan Barnes

Barnes (Source: Gregory Alan Barnes)

For the Digital Media Association, copyright’s a big issue. They represent online digital content distributors, including movies, music and books, and members include Apple, Amazon, Google (which owns YouTube), Pandora and Rhapsody.  Technocrat chatted with the group’s general counsel, Gregory A. Barnes, about the policy issues on his plate and more.

Q: On policy issues what’s on the front burner for you?

A: There’s a lot. Right now, as you may know, Copyright Office is conducting this comprehensive review of the Copyright Act. And so they’ve gone through two separate rounds of requests for comments and DiMA’s participated, basically indicating what aspects of the copyright law we think need to be updated.

We’re also working very closely, or at least monitoring, work that’s taking place right now within the Department of Justice. DOJ right now is looking at the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees. We believe they’re going to make a decision whether they want to modify those consent decrees or keep them as they are today.

… That process is important to us because the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees dictate the terms at which my member companies license content from ASCAP and BMI.

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October 6, 2014

The Week Ahead: Open Internet & Surveillance Impact Roundtables

The Federal Communications Commission’s law-focused Open Internet roundtables and Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden‘s Silicon Valley roundtable on surveillance impacts are among the events on tap this week

Monday

The Progressive Policy Institute, along with the Internet Society’s Greater Washington D.C. Chapter and George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy host an event titled “Sizing Up the Digital Economy,” a panel discussion on a International Trade Commission report.

Tuesday

The FCC holds Open Internet roundtable sessions on “Sources of Legal Authority” and “Construction of Legally Sustainable Rules.”

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation holds an event on data-driven innovation.

Wednesday

Wyden holds a roundtable in Silicon Valley on the impact of surveillance.

The American Enterprise Institute hosts an event featuring Jeff Pulver, known for his work on Voice over Internet Protocol.

Thursday

George Mason University School of Law’s Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property kicks off a two-day intellectual property conference.

The Internet Innovation Alliance and Pew Research Center hold an event titled “Killer Apps in the Gigabit Age: New Research & Panel Discussion.”

The Center for Global Development holds an event titled “Delivering on the Data Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa.”

October 2, 2014

Tech Subcommittee Chairmen Vulnerable in November

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Lee Terry, R-Neb., participates in a House Energy and Commerce Committee Communications and Technology Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday July 10, 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The November elections are just around the corner, and among Roll Call’s lists of most vulnerable lawmakers are chairman of a few subcommittees with jurisdiction over tech issues.

Among the 10 most vulnerable House members is Nebraska Republican Lee Terry. He’s chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade, which has jurisdiction over certain tech issues. Terry’s bill targeting “patent troll” demand letters was marked up by the subcommittee in July.

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September 26, 2014

Weekly Recap: Comcast’s Merger Comments, Google on Data Localization & Jason Chaffetz

The week wraps up with the Federal Trade Commission’s 100-year birthday. Here’s a look at some of the highlights from this week in Washington and a few Technocrat posts from this week, in case you missed them.

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Friday Q&A: Application Developers Alliance’s Tim Sparapani

Tim 335x335 Friday Q&A: Application Developers Alliances Tim Sparapani

(Source: Application Developers Alliance)

The Application Developers Alliance, which *surprise* represents app developers, is just a couple years old and has roughly 40,000 individual and nearly 180 companies as members. The policy issues they focus on are data and patents and Technocrat talked with the group’s vice president for policy, law and government affairs, Tim Sparapani. He was previously Facebook’s public policy director and senior legislative counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union.

Q: What are your top policy issues that you’re working on right now?

A: Well, it’ll be no surprise that most of them revolve around data.

And, you know, because our members are the experts in how to build new and novel technologies, using both businesses’ and the public’s data, there are a whole host of questions that arise from that.

So, they sort of span the globe of things. But mostly it’s about how we can use data wisely and well to benefit consumers and the public writ large.

Sometimes people sort of truncate this by calling it a privacy debate. Well, it’s a lot more than that. You know, it’s a really a sort of a debate about whether data can be used to solve a series of societal problems, as our members believe it can be. And whether we can provide increasingly customized and personalized services and benefits to individuals, which give them tools and services that before the app industry arose used to cost them a whole lot of money, and now we can hopefully give them to them for free or nearly so. So it’s also about consumer benefit.

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September 24, 2014

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, His Tech Interests & Five Guys

chaffetz 281 102813 445x269 Rep. Jason Chaffetz, His Tech Interests & Five Guys

Rep. Jason Chaffetz does a television interview from the rotunda in the Russell Senate Office Building on Oct. 28, 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz sits on the House Judiciary subcommittee with jurisdiction over intellectual property and information technology issues, is a prolific user of Twitter and is interested in the intersection of security, technology and privacy.

CQ Roll Call’s updated profile of Chaffetz went online (subscription) earlier this week and a significant portion of it looks at his work and stances on tech policy issues, including: online gambling, music royalty rates and legislation that would allow states to collect sales taxes on online purchases made by residents, even when the retailer is out of state.

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September 23, 2014

Lofgren: Section 1201 in ‘Desperate Need of a Fix’

lofgren 101 051612 445x335 Lofgren: Section 1201 in Desperate Need of a Fix

Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., participates in a House Democrats’ news conference on May 16, 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One of California Democrat Zoe Lofgren’s legislative priorities for next Congress: a change to anti-circumvention provisions in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

In an interview, the Silicon Valley member of the House Judiciary Committee, said she didn’t know “that we will be able to get consensus to do this,” but said “Section 1201 is in desperate need of a fix.”

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