Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
October 22, 2014

Posts in "Privacy"

October 21, 2014

Hatch Calls for ECPA, ‘Patent Troll’ Legislation in Next Congress

 

hatch002 0514131 445x287 Hatch Calls for ECPA, Patent Troll Legislation in Next Congress

Sen. Orrin Hatch the leaves the Senate side carriage entrance of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In prepared remarks for a speech Tuesday detailing a wide-ranging “innovation agenda” for the next Congress, Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, called for enactment of legislation targeting abusive patent litigation as well as changes to electronic privacy law.

In his written remarks for a speech at Overstock.com in Salt Lake City, Utah, the Utah Republican said about a patent litigation bill: “I intend to do everything in my power next Congress to pass such legislation.”

Full story

October 20, 2014

The Week Ahead: ‘Right to Be Forgotten,’ Net Neutrality and Cybersecurity

Events on the “right to be forgotten,” net neutrality are cybersecurity are on tap for this week.

Monday

Georgetown University holds a panel event on the “right to be forgotten.”

Tuesday

FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai holds a net neutrality forum at Texas A&M University.

Wednesday

The Atlantic Council hosts an event on the current landscape of cyber threats.

Microsoft hosts a panel discussion on cybersecurity and state and local governments.

The Brookings Institution holds a panel discussion on the 1934 Communications Act.

Thursday

The George Washington University Law School holds an event on net neutrality and global Internet freedom.

October 17, 2014

Weekly Wrapup: Encryption, Patent Office and Robots

FBI Director James B. Comey’s remarks on encryption and law enforcement access to data, the nomination of Michelle K. Lee to head the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and a Q&A on robots and the law were among the highlights from the last few days. Check out the Mid-Week Catchup for happenings from earlier this week.

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October 15, 2014

How Should the Government Approach Self-Driving Cars?

490253483 445x335 How Should the Government Approach Self Driving Cars?

An interior view of a Google self-driving car is seen in Mountain View, California, on May 13, 2014. (GLENN CHAPMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

When thinking about possible privacy and security-related regulation of intelligent vehicle technologies, the Mercatus Center’s Adam Thierer wants to see voluntary best practices along with evolving common law, as opposed to passing laws he contends could quickly become outdated.

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October 10, 2014

Weekly Recap: Net Neutrality, Mobile ‘Cramming’ and a Spacewalk

Among the highlights in happenings from the past few days: President Barack Obama talked net neutrality, AT&T Mobility agreed to a $105 million settlement over mobile “cramming” allegations, and an astronaut popular on Twitter took his first spacewalk outside the International Space Station. That and more news highlights as well as some Technocrat posts are below. For happenings from earlier this week, check out the Mid-Week Catchup.

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October 8, 2014

Mid-Week Catchup: Twitter’s Lawsuit, Student Data Privacy & AT&T’s Data Breach

Need to catch up on what’s happened in tech policy news over the past day or so? A few highlights include Twitter’s lawsuit against the federal government, student data privacy and an AT&T data breach.

  • The Software & Information Industry Association and the Future of Privacy Forum released an education privacy pledge on student data, with Microsoft and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt among the companies that signed on.  A few stories point out that some big name companies did not sign on, like Apple, Google and Pearson.

October 2, 2014

Tech Subcommittee Chairmen Vulnerable in November

terry 032 071012 445x296 Tech Subcommittee Chairmen Vulnerable in November

Lee Terry, R-Neb., participates in a House Energy and Commerce Committee Communications and Technology Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday July 10, 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The November elections are just around the corner, and among Roll Call’s lists of most vulnerable lawmakers are chairman of a few subcommittees with jurisdiction over tech issues.

Among the 10 most vulnerable House members is Nebraska Republican Lee Terry. He’s chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade, which has jurisdiction over certain tech issues. Terry’s bill targeting “patent troll” demand letters was marked up by the subcommittee in July.

Full story

September 26, 2014

Friday Q&A: Application Developers Alliance’s Tim Sparapani

Tim 335x335 Friday Q&A: Application Developers Alliances Tim Sparapani

(Source: Application Developers Alliance)

The Application Developers Alliance, which *surprise* represents app developers, is just a couple years old and has roughly 40,000 individual and nearly 180 companies as members. The policy issues they focus on are data and patents and Technocrat talked with the group’s vice president for policy, law and government affairs, Tim Sparapani. He was previously Facebook’s public policy director and senior legislative counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union.

Q: What are your top policy issues that you’re working on right now?

A: Well, it’ll be no surprise that most of them revolve around data.

And, you know, because our members are the experts in how to build new and novel technologies, using both businesses’ and the public’s data, there are a whole host of questions that arise from that.

So, they sort of span the globe of things. But mostly it’s about how we can use data wisely and well to benefit consumers and the public writ large.

Sometimes people sort of truncate this by calling it a privacy debate. Well, it’s a lot more than that. You know, it’s a really a sort of a debate about whether data can be used to solve a series of societal problems, as our members believe it can be. And whether we can provide increasingly customized and personalized services and benefits to individuals, which give them tools and services that before the app industry arose used to cost them a whole lot of money, and now we can hopefully give them to them for free or nearly so. So it’s also about consumer benefit.

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September 24, 2014

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, His Tech Interests & Five Guys

chaffetz 281 102813 445x269 Rep. Jason Chaffetz, His Tech Interests & Five Guys

Rep. Jason Chaffetz does a television interview from the rotunda in the Russell Senate Office Building on Oct. 28, 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz sits on the House Judiciary subcommittee with jurisdiction over intellectual property and information technology issues, is a prolific user of Twitter and is interested in the intersection of security, technology and privacy.

CQ Roll Call’s updated profile of Chaffetz went online (subscription) earlier this week and a significant portion of it looks at his work and stances on tech policy issues, including: online gambling, music royalty rates and legislation that would allow states to collect sales taxes on online purchases made by residents, even when the retailer is out of state.

Full story

September 22, 2014

Week Ahead: OkCupid, High-Skilled Immigration Policy & Cross-Border Data Flows

Lawmakers are out of town for several weeks, and that means a somewhat quieter week in Washington. But there’s still plenty going on, with OkCupid’s co-founder and president talking at Sixth & I as well as events on high-skilled immigration policy and and cross-border data flows.

Monday

OkCupid’s Christian Rudder caused a stir this summer over a blog post about experiments the online dating site has conducted. He has a new book out and he’ll be at Sixth & I on Monday talking to The Atlantic’s Megan Garber.

On Monday and Tuesday, The National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy hosts a conference titled “High-Skilled Immigration Policy & the Global Competition for Talent.”

Tuesday

On Tuesday, The Brookings Institution hosts an event releasing three papers proposing ways to spur more efficient use of government-owned spectrum.

Wednesday

The Center for Democracy & Technology on Wednesday holds an event on education, data and privacy.

Thursday

On Thursday, Brookings hosts a panel discussion on challenges to cross-border data flows and their potential impacts on communications, trade and commerce.

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