Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
September 21, 2014

System Has Sent 1.3 Million Copyright Warnings Already

A private-sector program set up to deter online copyright infringement  has issued more than 1.3 million alerts to consumers in its first 10 months.

The Center for Copyright Information — which administers the Copyright Alert System and was created by various Internet service providers, the The Recording Industry Association of America and the Motion Picture Association of America — issued a report with those numbers today.

Under the program also known as “six strikes,” content owners deploy third parties to scan peer-to-peer networks, which send copyright infringement notices to Internet service providers, which then send alerts to consumers. If notices continue, Internet service providers can take actions like slowing down Internet speed or redirecting to a “landing page” pending further action by the account holder.

The progress report released Wednesday shows that more than 2 million notices were sent to Internet service providers and that more than 1.3 million alerts were sent to 722,820 accounts.

And the program is “slated to at least double the number of notices sent and processed in size in the coming year,” the report states.

Of the alerts, more than 70 percent were at the initial informational stage while less than 3 percent were at the final mitigation stage, according to the report. The alerts are designed as a three-tiered system.

“While further analysis of future data will need to be done, we already believe that many accounts sent Alerts appear to be deterred after the first Alert is received,” the report states. It adds that there are many reasons that an account is “not seen again as infringing again under the program — and we do not feel justified in attributing the steep reduction from Educational alerts to Mitigation Alerts solely to the CAS.”

“Its only 10 months,” said Jerry Berman who sits on the group’s advisory board and founded the Center for Democracy and Technology, adding that there’s reason to be cautious and look at more data. Berman was talking at a panel event hosted by the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.

He said the results are “encouraging,” but said the group wasn’t trying to state a certain success rate — but said there were enough positive indicators to keep going.

  • Ryan

    I’d estimate that the automated YouTube content ID matching system beats that number in false positives alone every quarter.

  • YONATAN C

    THE 2.6 MILLION UNEMPLOYED FAMILIES HAVE BECOME THE LOSERS IN THE UNEMPLOYMENT EXTENSION FIASCO. BOTH POLITICAL PARTIES HAVE FAILED THESE FAMILIES MISERABLY. THEY HAVE USED THESE FAMILIES AS BARGAINING CHIPS, AND FOR POLITICAL LEVERAGE, AND HAVE HELD THE EXTENSION BILL “HOSTAGE” IN THE SENATE FOR THE PASSED FIVE MONTHS. BOTH PARTIES HAD NO INTENTION TO PASS THE BILL, BUT JUST GACE LIP SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC AND PRESS. WHILE MILLIONS OF FAMILIES HAVE LOST HOMES AND EVERYTHING, THE POLITICANS NOW CLAIM THAT IT’S TOO LATE TO PASS THE BILL, AND HAVE FORGOTTEN ABOUT IT. IN THE COMING ELECTIONS I HOPE THE AMERICAN PEOPKE DO NOT FORGET AND THAT THEY VOTE THESE POLITICAL PARASITES FROM OFFICE, THEY ARE NOT WORTHY TO REPRESENT US

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